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Embracing Goodness in Ourselves and Others

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Embracing Goodness in Ourselves and Others

Terri Werner is a graduate of the 2005 Newfield Certified Coach Training Program.

Is everyone born with a ‘core self’ that is fundamentally good, wise, strong, creative, and whole? I believe so.

Do you? If so, what led you to that belief?

Often, the beliefs we hold of ourselves and others emerge from childhood experiences. Left unchecked those beliefs often continue throughout our lifetime.

Having worked for many years with men in a medium security prison, it was a common occurrence to learn they frequently came from a background of abuse and neglect, receiving messages such as “You’re no good,” or “You’ll never amount to anything.” Many of us received or have told ourselves similar messages. If we then go on to believe them as “The TRUTH,” whether conscious or unconscious, it can become a self-fulfilling prophecy, limiting our life choices and possibilities.

But, what happens when we become rooted in a belief that our core self is deeply good, wise, strong, creative, and whole? One possibility is we may begin to free ourselves from restrictive past messaging still affecting our lives today. We may begin to see opportunities that we did not see before.

Re-exploring past experiences that led to self-defeating patterns, changing those ingrained habits, taking responsibility for our behavior and results so we can build a good life all takes courage, intention, and belief in our ability to change. An inmate once told me, “Terri, this is hard work, and many days I don’t want to do it. But because you believe that I can do it, I start to believe it too.”

I believe one of the greatest gifts a human being can be given is to be treated with dignity, to have their capabilities seen and believed in, and to be acknowledged for their innate goodness. When we give this gift to ourselves or to others, miracles can occur.

Two exercises you might try (#1 to cultivate self-love and #2 to increase seeing the goodness in others):

  1. Take a moment to close your eyes and look at yourself with a wholehearted belief in your capabilities. What does this shift?
  2. Next time you speak with someone, speak in a way that acknowledges and honors their deepest goodness. What changes?

Want to learn more about our course offerings? Check out our Foundation Course for transformative personal development and the first step towards becoming a Certified Coach.

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Author: Terri Werner

Terri’s mission is to inspire people to see new possibilities believe in themselves and their capability, have the courage to try the previously unimaginable and move from ordinary to extraordinary in both their personal and professional life.

Through a combination of training, facilitation and coaching her clients transform how they are using their focus and energy, design a more powerful and effective way of being (body, language, and mood); communicate more effectively, and work with others so that efforts flow.
Leaders learn how to create a culture of accountability and excellence in execution where the team members experience high creativity, performance, and morale; are resilient and adapt to change; have more impact and customer satisfaction; and accomplish goals faster and easier, with less stress and more enjoyment.

Terri guides clients in a way that creates self-responsibility and sustainable change. Her clients feel inspired, empowered, and ready to take action. She would love to talk to you about how you and your team can achieve the breakthrough results you have been longing for. You can find her at www.EnergyFlowConsulting.com

Degree(s) MS - Applied Behavioral Science, concentration in Organization Development, including the Fellows in Change Management Program, 1995, Johns Hopkins University Baltimore, MD. BS - Technology & Management, 1988, University of Maryland, University College (UMUC) College Park, MD

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